creamy tomato basil pasta (vegan/gluten-free…I know, but it’s really good)

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You should know that I used to be addicted to pasta. As someone who used to drink men under the table, under the floorboards, I know a bit about compulsion, about the need to feel anesthetized. To be here, but not really, and you know how it is. It got to a point where I went through several boxes of pasta a week. I’d have a pesto pasta for lunch and gnocchi for dinner, and I’d only post a photo of a kale salad or green smoothie, but you know all about that faux Insta life–it’s proliferated all over the internet to a point where one could call it a disease.

When my doctor and nutritionist broke the news, that even after these nine months of living gluten-free I can never eat like I had before, I was practically catatonic. I kept asking how did this happen? How did I allow myself to get to this place? How had I substituted a glass of red wine for a seemingly demure plate of cacio e pepe? Had I been asleep for the bulk of my waking life to only wake to a smack in the face? When I learned that I could only have gluten OR dairy once a week, that pasta would soon be relegated to an occasion meal, it took a while to accept this. It took a good two weeks to overcome my withdrawal from gluten.

Even now, even when there are so many terrific gluten-free pasta options (I found Bioitalia while I was in Spain and I’m hooked), I have to be careful. Because I’m swapping out gluten for rice, potato and other starches, which are fine in moderation but don’t for a healthy, balanced diet make. And I’ve got this thing for developing unhealthy attachments to specific foods (Exhibits A, B, C: pasta, avocados, chickpeas–all of which required individually-deployed fatwas). So know that when I post a pasta recipe it better be a DAMN GOOD ONE because I can’t have it for another week or two.

You should know that cashew/almond cream is the best thing to have entered my life since Cup4Cup flour. The combination yields the creamy texture and taste of heavy cream without the bloat and the sickening full feeling that invariably happens when you feast on any dairy-rich dish.

Trust me on this.

Part of me wishes I’d never found this recipe because now I have leftovers in the fridge that I can’t touch until the end of the week. DO YOU UNDERSTAND THE GLUTEN STRUGGLE? It’s real, friends. Real.

INGREDIENTS: Recipe from The Oh She Glows Cookbook, with modifications
1/2 cup roasted unsalted cashews (soaked for 2 hours, or overnight)
1/2 cup unsweetened, unflavored almond milk
9 ounces uncooked gluten-free pasta (basically 3/4 of a package)
1 tsp olive oil
1 small shallot, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 1/2 cups canned crushed tomatoes, drained (I use San Marzano)
1/2 cup sundried tomatoes, chopped
3 handfuls baby kale
1 cup packed fresh basil, finely chopped
2-3 tbsp tomato paste
2 tsp dried oregano
1/2 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp black pepper

DIRECTIONS
Start by soaking the cashews. Place the cashews in a bowl and add enough water to cover. Soak for at least 2 hours, or overnight. Drain and rinse. Blitz the nuts and almond milk in a high-speed blender until smooth and creamy (approximately 1 minute). Set aside.

Boil water and cook pasta according to instructions on package.

In a large pan, heat oil over medium heat. Saute onions and garlic for 5-10 minutes, until translucent. Add tomatoes and kale and continue cooking for 7-10 minutes over medium-high heat, until the kale is wilted.

Stir in the cashew cream, basil, tomato paste, oregano, salt, and pepper, and cook for another 5-10 minutes, or until heated through.

Drain the pasta (reserving 1/4 cup of the pasta water) and add it to the sauce. Add the reserve pasta water, and stir to combine well, cooking for a few minutes until heated through.

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gluten-free almond honey cake

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It always amazes me how the smallest of lights can shine so brightly. While I spent the week moping, lamenting for a life that could have been but isn’t, I came across this article in Publisher’s Weekly, a trade mag for those who geek out on publishing stories. I’m not entirely sure how I discovered Anna Watson Carl, but I remembered admiring her photography and being enamored by her food philosophy–food being the thing that binds people, and how meals have this arcane way of cultivating lasting, rich relationships. Food is primal, and the fact that we share our basest of needs with someone else means something. Or at least it does to me. And Anna.

I also admired Anna’s spirit, her desire to not be tethered to publishing schedules and editorial conformity. Rather, she would create the cookbook she wanted, on her own terms, on her own schedule. I supported her Kickstarter, and was jubilant to have received her book a month later.

Friends, this book is worth owning. These are the kind of meals you make for gatherings, for your beloveds. You toast minor victories and major celebrations with the dishes in Watson’s cookbook. From rosemary biscuits with fig jam and prosciutto (alas, there is gluten in this book, but there are plenty of gf options) to spicy black bean soup and roasted winter squash with kale and pomegranate seeds–you will want to cook everything in this book. The photography is simple, clean and austere, yet the food is welcoming and warm, and this juxtaposition–the beauty of food and the warmth of it–always confounds me in the best of ways.

Reading her journey to publication inspired me to think about my book (and subsequent projects) through a different lens. Why must a book be a piece of cardboard binding several hundred pages? A story can take on many forms–visual, audio, text, and the magic is how we make all of it cohere. The magic is in the ingredients, the assembly. Much like cooking, I guess.

The beat is turning around, my friends, and I toasted the end to a rather long week with a fat slice of almond cake.

INGREDIENTS: Recipe from The Yellow Table Cookbook
4 eggs (room temperature), separated
1/2 cup lavender honey (or wildflower/raw honey)
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1 3/4 cups almond meal

DIRECTIONS
Preheat the oven to 350F. Spray a 9-inch springform pan with coconut oil cooking spray. I either use the kind from Spectrum, or I use softened coconut oil. Even when I return to dairy, I’ll continue to use coconut oil for the mild flavor it imbues and it’s silk texture is TO DIE.

In a medium bowl, combine the egg yolks, honey, vanilla, baking soda, and salt. Whisk until smooth. Add the almond meal and whisk until smooth. At first, you’ll likely freak out (as I did) that you have too much meal and not enough liquid, but don’t fret, whisk for a good minute and the goods will come together beautifully.

In a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the egg whites on high until they are foamy and white, with soft peaks (not stiff). This will take 1.5-2 minutes. Gently fold the egg whites into the almond mixture with a spatula. This will take some time as you have a lot of whites and a thick cake batter. Make sure you fold gently, yet incorporating all of the almond meal.

Pour the mixture into the prepared pan and bake for 25-30 minutes or until golden brown and a tester inserted into the middle of the cake comes out smooth. Let cool on a cooling rack for 10 minutes, then carefully run a knife around the edges of the cake and remove the outer ring. Let the cake cool completely before serving.

Gently remove the cake from the bottom of the springform pan with a spatula. Serve with fresh berries, confectioner’s sugar, or pistachio ice cream. I had this on its own and it was DIVINE. Slightly sweet and crumbly.

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bacon sandwich with almond, goat cheese, and parsley pesto

What better way to kick off the weekend than with a little bacon, copious amounts of carbs and some pesto? Chalk this up to a freelancer’s life, but I love the fact that my days are such that I get to come home and indulge in a delicious lunch. This weekend, I’m packing for Dublin, cleaning {cleaning, cleaning} and testing out recipes from Ms. Dahl’s stunning cookbook.

Bye the bye, if you have any recommendations for eats in Dublin, please leave them in the comments!

INGREDIENTS: Pesto recipe courtesy of Sophie Dahl’s Very Fond of Food
For the pesto
2 cloves garlic, peeled
Salt and pepper
2 large handfuls of fresh parsley
½ cup /50g blanched almonds
1 cup/200g soft goat cheese
3 tablespoons olive oil
A squeeze of lemon juice or some lemon zest

1 ciabatta roll {warmed slightly in the oven}
3 strips of applewood smoked bacon

DIRECTIONS
In a food processor (or Vitamix), blitz the pesto ingredients. Season, giving the mixture a squeeze of lemon juice or a grating of lemon zest if you feel like it. This recipe yields quite a bit of pesto, so store the remainder in an airtight container {Sophie’s recipe had you adding this to a pound of delicious penne pasta as a dinner course}.

In a large frying pan, space apart three strips of paper and cook for two minutes on each side. When done, generously slather the cheesy pesto onto both sides of the warmed ciabatta roll. Fold the strips of bacon, and if you’ve got a handful of arugula or spinach, feel free to toss that into the lot.

Enjoy!

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eat this now: watermelon and feta salad with toasted almonds!

Watermelon, Feta, and Almond Salad
Nothing truly embodies the taste of summer other than watermelon. The crunchy seeds juxtaposed with that cool, juicy melon — I have fond memories of splashing in a johnny pump, a sticky mess of watermelon covering my chin. So it’s with great affection that I’ve whipped up an adult version of my revered summer treat.

INGREDIENTS
6-8 cups cubed watermelon
4 ounces of feta (I tend to shy away from the crumbly version as I prefer hearty chunks)
1 sprig of rosemary, leaves removed, fine dice
2 sprigs of thyme, leaves removed, fine dice
1 clove minced garlic
3 tablespoons of olive oil
1 tablespoon of white whine vinegar
salt/pepper to season and taste
1/2 cup blanched, slivered almonds, toasted in an ungreased skillet, until brown

DIRECTIONS
In a large bowl, whisk the olive oil, vinegar, rosemary, thyme, salt and pepper, until you get a vinaigrette emulsion. You should nix the vinegar, and marinade the feta in the oil and spice mixture — either way is FAB.

Toss the feta in the dressing/mixture and allow to sit at room temperature for 15 minutes. Combine with watermelon and add in the almonds. The nutty crunch married with the yielding, salty feta and cool watermelon are divine!

Serve cold or at room temperature.

Watermelon, Feta, and Almond Salad