people who inspire

Below is a list of people who inspire me on a daily basis. Whether it’s their words, images or affection for celebrating a good life, I work hard to cultivate a list of online lights that will hopefully awaken your senses, too.

a couple cooks
adventures in cooking
a love of sentences
bake anything
brooklyn supper
dolly + oatmeal
edible perspective
elephantine
frolic
handle the heat
henry happened
lost in cheeseland
love + lemons
naturally ella
no thyme to waste
oh she glows
pancake princess
perpetually chic
posse
seven spoons
sips and spoonfuls
sprouted kitchen
steph’s apartment kitchen
summer pierre
sweet fine day
talulaah
the fielding report
the habit of being
the sparkly life
the stripe
this grand adventure
what should I eat for breakfast today?
with food and love

13 thoughts on “people who inspire

  1. Wow! Thank you so much for the shout-out. I just discovered your blog and love it! And we have something in common: I am also a Columbia graduate! Going to add you to my blog roll and dig into your archives this weekend. 🙂

    All the best
    Milsters

    (littlepiecesoflight.com)

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  2. Dear Felicia,

    (I tweeted you last night! So here’s my comment/question :))…

    I started a “mission” of sorts last year to try to get the foods and traditions if Ramadan a little more exposure. When I was working on my dissertation about 4 years ago, I wasn’t working and during my research breaks, I actually watched daytime tv for the first time in years. When Ramadan came around, I noticed that absolutely nothing was ever ever explained, demonstrated, or celebrated on TV, as all other holidays are. Easter, Hanukkah, and Christmas recipes (to name a few) are all abundantly highlighted on all daytime talk shows and food network. Ramadan, which lasts a whole month, and is alllllll about food and rich with culture and delicious foods, doesn’t get a glance. Well, finally last year, after incessant writing to the hosts of the abc show The Chew, someone listened, and they invited me on their show for a cooking segment. While the recipe was called a Ramadan recipe, it was included on a show topic of “Foods of Mystery.” Still, it was progress and I was hopeful that my appearance on TV made some leeway for Ramadan in the US. But this year, there was much of the same.

    I did write the editor of Food & Wine, and after some perseverance, I managed to get a short online piece on Ramadan, but it was anti-climatic because there was no description on the traditions of Ramadan, and I couldn’t use original recipes, only those featured already on their website (http://www.foodandwine.com/blogs/2013/07/08/f-and-ws-best-dishes-for-ramadan). But again, it was something. This year, even though I wrote consistently for months, The Chew ignored my requests to feature Ramadan again. Yet, when I saw on their thanksgiving show that Hanukkah was given an entire episode to feature their foods of celebration, I felt jilted. I have nothing against featuring all holidays, but they should all be represented equally if at all.

    So my question to you is, as a food blogger, writer, with a wonderfully creative and ponderous outlook on life, how do you think I should continue on this mission? I don’t want to give it up. Suggestions, please, or do you think it’s futile? Ok I’ll stop writing now, I’ve already written so much!

    Thanks for listening/reading…xo!

    Sincerely,
    Mais

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    1. Mais,

      Thank you for writing! It is interesting that you share this as I was watching a piece on the news yesterday about Thai fast food street vendors. The feature was on a couple who created a market for friend insects in Thailand, and how they are making an incredible profit in comparison with other street vendors. How this relates is a quote that the husband shared, “We created our own market.”

      If you find you’re being ignored by traditional outlets, who focus on servicing large groups of people in their targeted demographic, then create the change you wish to see. Research the web for sites, communities, blogs on Ramadan (admittedly, I’m not familiar with the holiday beyond the basics), or those who would potentially be interested in learning more about traditions + food during this time. Then perhaps create something that will service that community, whether it be a blog, social network, etc. Create something that focuses on quality + community, and the audience will come.

      This is the best advice I have to offer, so I hope it helps.

      Cheers, Felicia

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  3. Thank you Felicia! It’s definitely a works in progress, but one I am passionate about. It is hard to make change. But that just makes the victory all that much sweeter, non? I did try a blog a few years ago. I just didn’t have the stamina for it…I was too worried about what my readers would think, so I eventually petered out at the end. But it’s been like a knock on my head, it bangs me suggestively every once in a while and I feel the urge to make my fingers work again.

    Thank you again, I’ll keep reading your blog joyfully, while I entertain the thoughts of mine!

    Sincerely,
    Mais

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  4. What a lovely way to refer blogs. And what an accomplished woman your are. Congratulations on all that you’ve achieved so far… I find inspiration in innate talent cloaked in a humble and helpful approach-thank you. And, love the pristine blog format.
    AnnMarie
    new blogger

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  5. Felicia!

    Thank you so much for the friendly shout out, I am so grateful to be on this list! It really means a lot. Your space is one of the only ones I follow and read regularly, and I admire your willingness to share life in it’s raw moments. That’s what makes us feel good: to share, and that’s what others love to engage in. To know something about you other than: “this is how I decorated this cupcake!”, ya know?!

    Thank you for sharing life as it really is, we all love it!

    Ashley

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