honey quick oat bread + a bit of honesty

IMG_2654IMG123
The dismal fact is that self-respect has nothing to do with the approval of others — who are, after all, deceived easily enough; has nothing to do with reputation, which, as Rhett Butler told Scarlett O’Hara, is something people with courage can do without. Character — the willingness to accept responsibility for one’s own life — is the source from which self-respect springs. — Joan Didion

I’ve been careless with myself. There was a time when I was a young girl trying on her mother’s adult clothes, standing in front a mirror, observing how a green dress fit. Turning this way and that, I realized it had fit all too well. Here was a child playing adult, taking on the shape of it, and realizing that it was a shape that had become all too comfortable. I wasn’t the girl who fell out of her mother’s heels or drowned in a waistless dress, rather I was the child where the world of adult fit, and I never grew accustomed to that. Even now, even as I write this.

For the past two months, I’ve been treading some deep waters, getting lost in the thick of nostalgia. I download the songs I used to sing off-key, and I pull out moth-eaten sweaters in hopes they’ll still fit. The wave is tremendous, so much so that it swallows you whole, and the undertow of that previous life threatens to bring you under. Because when you think about the songs and the sweaters and all of that, you forget the darkness that surrounded it. Suddenly, your memory becomes selective, surgical, and you’re forever trying to find the romance in the one part of your life you once were so desperate to leave behind.

Lately, the songs have taken on an octave that is gruesome, and the sweaters threaten to suffocate and maim. This old time is telling you to leave it, let it go quietly into the night. Don’t start poking around. Don’t get a taste for nostalgia, because it’ll only be your ruin.

tumblr_mdfbsluDqH1qdaw6do1_500Grief is a cruel thing, and there is a moment when I felt as if the losses were incalculable. And in that space of grief, which was large and seemingly bottomless, I became careless. I started drinking against my better judgment, and as the weeks progressed, the world felt sonnet small. I felt boxed in, no way out but a little light at the end of the alleyway. That light being the life that I’d built for nearly seven years calling my name. Downright shouting it. My relationship with the drink is a complicated one, one not so easily defined by labels and monikers, and for a time I thought it was something I could return to, but then I lost Sophie, and the whole of my world bleached down to bone.

I debated whether or not I should reveal this bit of information on this space — the fact that I had started drinking, it didn’t work out, and now I’m back to being off the sauce, with a team of beloveds on my back — but then I realized how much I had helped other people, friends, strangers, by being honest and brave and bold and not being ashamed of saying that I’m not someone who can handle her drink. I’m someone who, instead, has to design a more mindful and healthy life. I’m someone who doesn’t judge because, seriously, who am I to judge.

For the past few weeks, I knew something was wrong. And I thought about my life, and how much reconstruction I had to do on it, and I realized that I’d finally made a leap to create something real and beautiful, and why would I ruin that? Why would I chose to spend my days boxed in, when I go out and write books, meet people, build companies, love, live, eat, stretch, be.

Alcohol is the one thing that can ruin. It removes choice because you allow it to. It reduces your world to a singular, sustained heartbeat, and suddenly the vast, sweeping life as you know it becomes a metronome.

And why, why would I do that?

I made two important decisions this week that delivered my life back to me: I took the leap in faith and love and adopted Felix, and I was honest with myself in saying that alcohol may be the one thing that I need to abandon. In committing these words to this clean, white space, I open myself to judgment, misunderstanding, or petty gossip, but I don’t care. Because taking responsibility for my life and choosing to live it is my own reward. And in that new, glimmering shape, I know that there are oceans of people who are willing to shoulder me home. Never be ashamed of giving yourself your life back, ever.

So here I am, plotting all my days, giving myself a routine, and baking bread. And it feels damn good.

INGREDIENTS: Recipe adapted from Kitchen Daily
1 ⅛ cup 2 tablespoon plus 1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats or quick-cooking (not instant) oats, divided
1 ⅓ cup whole-wheat flour
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 ¼ tsp baking powder
1 ¼ tsp salt
8 oz nonfat or low-fat plain yogurt
1 large egg
¼ cup canola oil
¼ cup clover honey or other mild honey
¾ cup nonfat or low-fat milk (I used almond milk)
¼ tsp baking soda

DIRECTIONS
Position rack in middle of oven; preheat to 375°F. Generously coat a 9-by-5-inch (or similar size) loaf pan with cooking spray. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon oats in the pan. Tip the pan back and forth to coat the sides and bottom with oats; set aside another 1 tablespoon oats for garnishing the loaf.

Thoroughly stir together whole-wheat flour, all-purpose flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Using a fork, beat together the remaining 1 cup oats, yogurt, egg, oil and honey in a medium bowl until well blended. Stir in milk. Gently stir the yogurt mixture into the flour mixture just until thoroughly incorporated but not overmixed (excess mixing can cause toughening). Immediately scrape the batter into the pan, spreading evenly to the edges. Sprinkle the reserved 1 tablespoon oats over the top.

Bake the loaf until well browned on top and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, 40 to 50 minutes. (It’s normal for the top to crack.) Let stand in the pan on a wire rack for 15 minutes. Run a table knife around and under the loaf to loosen it and turn it out onto the rack. Let cool until barely warm, about 45 minutes.

Untitled

14 thoughts on “honey quick oat bread + a bit of honesty

  1. Felicia, your honesty is so lovely and I hope it is healing for you too. I am one of those people who will shoulder you home, for sure. Once again, thanks for sharing. And keep creating/writing. Now, go give Felix a hug for me.

    Like

  2. This is such a beautiful post, Felicia. My favorite line: “Never be ashamed of giving yourself your life back, ever.” Amen to that, and kudos to you for your continued commitment to peeling back the layers. Sending lots of love.

    Like

  3. In a world of bloggers professing their love for a processed food product on a “healthy” loving blog, recipes tgT claim to be THE BEST yet simply cannoy be and couples smiling in their pictures despite a world that simply cannot be THAT perfect, your honesty is so refreshing, appreciated, and necessary.

    Like

  4. Your honesty and work to build a quiet life with purpose and meaning are truly amazing. Long ago, when I blogged regularly, the name of my blog was This Quiet Life. Something I longed for and imagined in the midst of chaos, and masks and hiding. I’m a bit closer to having that life, now. Sometimes, I can’t quite believe it and look back or fall into old patterns. Only to remember what I’ve worked hard for and that there is still more to enjoy and accomplish ahead. Thank you for sharing…

    Like

  5. Love that opening quote.
    When I changed things around in my life I also found myself looking backward a bit, in my case trying to fathom out what plus what added up to this. Then one day as I was writing I wound up scrawling across the paper “This ends here” (meaning the effective hangover of all things past). I also came across the quote “In my defencelessness my salvation lies” and I’ve found that to be a good measure. If I don’t feel the need to defend my actions, I know I’m on the right path (even if others might not agree).
    I always look forward to reading your posts.
    ~ e.

    Like

  6. Hi Felicia,
    I heard of your blog through my friend Jess Goon, and I really love everything you have to share. I am so sorry for your loss of Sophie, and I really appreciate your honesty overall, but especially in this particular post. Thank you for having the courage to be so transparent about your grief, and about the elements in your life that are healing that grief. Your writing is so refreshing and helpful to me. I look forward to your posts.
    Best,
    Patrice

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s